Musee du Louvre a Famous Museum in the of Paris City

Musee du Louvre a Famous Museum in the of Paris City


If you are on vacation in Paris, don't miss to visit the famous Louvre Museum. The Louvre Museum is located on the Rive Droite Seine or the banks of the River Seine, the first arrondissement in Paris, France. I visited the Louvre Museum or in French this Musee du Louvre, the day after visiting the Eiffel Tower. Prior to this place I went to Notre-Dame de Paris.

From Notre-Dam on foot to the Musee du Louvre as it is not far away. Just walk along the banks of the Seine. Moreover, the view along the Seine is attractive and the pedestrian area is so comfortable that you don't feel the Musee du Louvre, which is inside the area of ​​the Louvre Palace (Palais du Louvre), is near. Before turning into the museum and palace area, stop at the bridge filled with love locks.

The Louvre or Louvre Museum is the largest museum in the world and a famous historical monument in Paris, France. The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace, the first Arrondissement in Paris, France. Nearly 35,000 items from prehistoric times to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of ​​60,600 square meters. 

The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace (Palais du Louvre) which was originally a fortress built in the 12th century under the reign of Philip II. The remains of the fort can be seen in the basement of the museum. This building was expanded several times to form the present Louvre Palace. So don't forget to stop by just to take pictures at the extraordinary Musee du Louvre.

In 1682, Louis XIV chose the Palace of Versailles as his private residence, leaving the Louvre to serve as a venue for displaying royal collections. In 1692, the building was occupied by the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres and the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture. The Académie remained at the Louvre for the next 100 years. During the French Revolution, the French National Assembly decreed that the Louvre should be used as a museum to display the nation's works.

The museum opened on August 10, 1793, with 537 paintings exhibited. The majority of these works were obtained from church and royal property confiscated by the French Government. Due to structural problems with the building, the museum was closed from 1796 to 1801. The number of museum collections increased under Napoleon's reign and the museum was renamed Musée Napoléon. After Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, most of the works confiscated by his troops returned to their original owners. The museum collection was further enhanced during the reigns of Louis XVIII and Charles X, and during the Second French Empire, the museum managed to acquire 20,000 collections. The museum collection continues to grow with donations and gifts that have continued to increase since the days of the Third French Republic. In 2008,

The museum's collection is divided into 8 sections, namely the Ancient Egypt section, archaeological objects from the Near East, Greece, Etruscans, Romans. Apart from that, there are Islamic arts, Sculpture, Decorative Arts, Painting and also Drawing and Prints. Every day, tourists from many countries around the world queue long to enter the glass pyramid or other door to view the museum's collections.

Some of the main collections are Venus de Milo, Nike of Samothrace, Raphael's, Michelangelo's paintings, and of course Leonardo da Vinci's paintings. However, what all visitors are looking for the most is the Monalisa painting which is located on the first floor. This Monalisa painting is protected by a thick glass. Given a limit in the form of a wooden fence so that this painting is protected from unwanted things. Because visitors are very busy in that room.

The number of museum collections increased under Napoleon's reign and the museum was renamed Musée Napoléon. After Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo, most of the works confiscated by his troops returned to their original owners. The museum collection was further increased during the reigns of Louis XVIII and Charles X, and during the Second French Empire, the museum managed to acquire 20,000 collections. The museum collection continues to grow with donations and gifts that have continued to increase since the days of the Third French Republic.